News

Daily Rosary and Mass for Deliverance from the Coronavirus

In accordance with my call for daily Prayer of the Holy Rosary to pray for global deliverance from the Coronavirus pandemic, to pray for those who are sick and those who have sadly died, and to give thanks to Almighty God for the dedication and self-sacrifice of our front-line emergency workers and other key workers, I invite you all to join in a live-stream of the Holy Rosary direct from a member of the NCCUKI Clergy’s private Chapel or study each day at 6pm BST.

You are all invited to join in: will it be possible to have a Rosary Circle that spans the entire world?

The pattern will be:

Mondays and Thursdays – the Joyful Mysteries

Tuesdays and Fridays – the Sorrowful Mysteries

Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays – the Glorious Mysteries.

The Prayers will be recited in Latin, but the Fatima Prayer after each Decade will be in English. There will be a brief meditation on each Mystery from Fr Patrick Peyton, well known as “the Rosary Priest”.

On Mondays until Saturdays, following the Rosary, the Holy Sacrifice of The Mass will be live-streamed (Latin, Missale Romanum of 1962). There will be a pause between the Rosary and the start of Mass whilst the Celebrant vests; the live stream will stay on during this time so that you may make your private preparatory prayers before Mass before the “virtual Altar”. You are most welcome to stay online to hear Mass each day.

On Sundays, the Holy Sacrifice of The Mass will be live streamed at 11am BST, and following the daily Rosary at 6pm there will be Benediction.

The live streams – Rosary and Mass or Rosary and Benediction – will be on the NCC United Kingdom and Ireland Facebook Page (fb.com/NCCUKI) each weekday from just before 6pm or each Sunday from just before 11am starting on Tuesday 14th April 2020. I will arrange a rota between myself, Bishop Michael and Fr Simon OSMC to officiate and host the live stream. However, the live stream of Mass each Sunday morning and of the Rosary and Benediction each Sunday evening will be from my Chapel.

Unfortunately the technology is not at the moment available to us to be able to hear the responses of anybody else who is taking part: but that does not matter, Almighty God is able to hear all of us as we make our prayers to Him.

May God’s Blessings be with you, and may you all stay safe and well.

‡Petrus Angliæ et Cambriæ
Archiepiscopus Metropolitanus

Let’s make an Easter resolution

Today we should relish the joy of Easter. We should thank God for letting us share in the victory. We shout thank God for giving us this hope. But let’s not stop there. Let’s not just enjoy Easter. Let’s not just eat chocolate eggs, and cakes. Let’s let Easter change our lives. 

Christ’s Resurrection is not just a nice idea: it is the power of eternal life at work in us. Surely we ought to do something for the weeks of the Easter season to plug into that power. Many of us have made an effort to live Lent in a special way. Many of us will have given something up for Lent. OK so, this year we have had to give up our physical church buildings for Lent. Giving something up is a practical way to give the special graces God sends during Lent some room to work in our souls. If we gave something up to live during the penitential season of Lent, then surely we ought to take something up as a way to help us live the joyful season of Easter. 

In the Gradual today, the Psalmist encourages us to remember that “This is the day that the Lord has made, let us rejoice and be glad in it.” Why do we not make an Easter resolution to help us do just that, to help us rejoice and to keep in mind the eternal life in Christ that is waiting for us if we remain faithful to him. 

It does not have to be complicated, it can be very simple. It could be watching a classic film together with your family each Sunday between now and Pentecost especially if it is a joyful, uplifting film. It could be having a special get-together with friends on Fridays, albeit one that will almost certainly be online due to the restrictions on our movements. Please do not have an actual gathering in your home or elsewhere. It could be taking some time to re-read some of your favourite books. 

If we ask the Holy Spirit to give us some ideas, he won’t be stingy. He just needs us to decide to let Easter make a difference in our lives, the way it ought. 

Our souls need that as much as they needed the time of penance and contrition that we lived in Lent. The Church is a wise mother giving us six weeks of Lent but eight weeks of Easter. 

Today, as we receive the risen Lord in the Eucharist spiritually or physically, let us promise him that we will find a way to benefit from that wisdom. 

✠ ✠ ✠ ✠ ✠

Deus, qui hodiérna die per Unigénitum tuum, æternitátis nobis ádiutum devicta morte resrásti: vota nostra, quæ præveniéndo aspíras, étiam adjuvándo proséquere. Per eúmdem Dóminum. Amen.

The Paschal Message of the Presiding Archbishop for 2020

Surrexit Christus Vere, Alleluia, Alleluia!

The traditional proclamation on Easter Sunday. However, one feels at the present time that “Alleluias”, though liturgically permitted, may not be quite appropriate for a while yet.

It goes without saying that we all are living today in troubled times. A virus, a disease, a plague, the like of which none of us have experienced in our lifetimes, or in the lifetimes of our parents, grips the entire world. Indiscriminate about whom it infects – young or old, rich or poor, entirely healthy or with underlying illness; nobody knows who might have been infected or who might be infected.

Read the rest by clicking on the link below.

Archbishop’s Easter Message 2020